Tag: CAA

Ministry of Home Affairs invites religious minorities from three neighbouring countries who have taken shelter in India to apply for citizenship
Asia, Featured, National

Ministry of Home Affairs invites religious minorities from three neighbouring countries who have taken shelter in India to apply for citizenship

The Ministry of Home Affairs, India has invited non-Muslims minorities from 3 neighbouring countries and have settled in 13 districts of Gujarat, Rajasthan, Chhattisgarh, Haryana and Punjab to apply for Indian citizenship. These minorities include Hindus, Sikhs, Jains, Buddhists, Parsis and Christians from Afghanistan, Bangladesh and Pakistan. The Home Ministry issued a notification in this […]

Free Flowing Lies of Freedom House and its Suppression of Facts
Analysis, Featured, National

Free Flowing Lies of Freedom House and its Suppression of Facts

The “Freedom in the World“ report takes a hit for its half truths, putting findings out of context, and suppressing facts by being subjective.
By having considerations of religious orientation of the candidates in their evaluation of how free a country is, the report implies that a community can be taken care of only by a person belonging to the same community.
The report comes to false and misleading conclusions over CAA and NRC ad hides the truth about Islam being the state religion of the neighbouring countries
If any rating agency describes a court ruling as favorable to some party instead of talking specific details of judgment only shows how immature and clueless the rating agency is about its methodology.
Instead of looking at the lockdown from the larger needs of a nation and overall safety of the society, the rating agency’s priority is somebody’s right to protest during a pandemic
There are many flaws in the Freedom report (in relation to India) that raises a big question on the objectivity of the report.

The Wolves in Sheep’s Clothing
Book Review

The Wolves in Sheep’s Clothing

Goenka’s book is an important contribution to the almost non-existent literature on India’s threats from within. Goenka’s expose needs to be viewed comprehensively in connection with the hybrid threat posed by India’s north-western neighbour. The actions of the “enemies within” are the root causes of our national security threats, to which the Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) only provides a supporting infrastructure. Our security forces have done a commendable job in targeting this sustaining factor. But the root cause can be addressed only by the Indian voter. For this, it is important that this book is read.